Santino’s “Trash into Cash” Initiative Yields Over $210K, Auctioning of Obsolete Equipment Supports Taxpayer Relief

Just two months after unveiling the town’s “Trash into Cash” program – which puts obsolete, old and broken down equipment on the online auction block – Supervisor Anthony J. Santino, Senior Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby, Councilman Anthony D’Esposito and Councilman Dennis Dunne, Sr. have announced that the initiative has yielded more than $210,000 in revenue. The Town of Hempstead was the first local municipality to create such a program, which kicked off on May 31, 2017, and which immediately garnered $135,000. The program will continue to generate money for Town of Hempstead taxpayers as additional equipment and supplies are being considered for auction.

The auction revenues could supplant an equal amount of property tax revenues that might otherwise be required to meet expenses. Partnering with Auctions International, the town is inventorying items that are no longer useable in serving town residents.  The auction company posts the surplus/obsolete inventory on the web, conducting Internet auctions. 

“We’re literally turning trash into cash,” Santino said. “While other municipalities are discarding similarly old and obsolete equipment, our town is making money by auctioning the items online and turning them into taxpayer savings.”

“From day one, Supervisor Santino has been committed to discovering innovative ways to save taxpayers money,” stated Goosby. “This ‘Trash into Cash’ program will certainly go a long way toward helping the hard-working residents of America’s largest township.”

Some of the auctioned equipment includes dump trucks, pickup trucks, communications equipment, cameras, vans, payloaders and road sanding vehicles, among other items.  Currently, the town is even looking to auction boats that have been donated to the town, some of which were damaged in Superstorm Sandy.  And, the town may have struck “pay dirt” as it is currently listing 11,000 cubic yards of “clean fill” dirt that the town has accumulated through various projects.

Under the contract with Auctions International, the town receives 100 percent of the sales price of auctioned items while Auctions International charges a “buyer’s premium.”   The company has extensive experience in Internet auctions that market the types of equipment and surplus material that Hempstead Town is seeking to sell.  The town commenced its partnership with the auction company in March of 2017. Sales prices range from $130 for some used cameras and printers to over $9,000 for an international payloader.

Some of the auctioned items and sales prices included:

-       1978 International Holmes Wrecker ($9,025)

-       1979 FWD Dump Truck ($3,350)

-       1982 Mack R60 Wrecker ($4,500)

-       2000 Hyundai HL720-3 Front End Loader ($9,400)

-       1972 Caterpillar D5 Bulldozer ($8,200)

“I am proud to partner with Supervisor Santino and my colleagues on the Hempstead Town Board to discover new ways of generating revenue to help maintain our township’s top-notch programs and services,” said D’Esposito. Added Councilman Dunne, “This program spearheaded by Supervisor Santino is proof that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and town taxpayers will continue to benefit.”

Santino explained that the revenue gained from the auction of obsolete town equipment can actually result in relief for town taxpayers.  In specific, the Supervisor noted that revenues gained from the program will help to meet the town’s budgeted expenses.  He emphasized that he greatly favors the use of revenues such as auction proceeds to meet expenses as opposed to drawing upon sources that impact town taxpayers.

“Programs like this are a ‘win-win’ for our taxpayers,” concluded Santino.  “From auctioning equipment from photography equipment to bulldozers, the Town of Hempstead is raising revenue and reducing the burden placed on local taxpayers.”